Zeal Protein Shake – Shake it for me!

This is it, the grand finale, the one we have all been waiting for. The thing in all of this that actually does what it says it does. It is the protein shake. It is the time tested meal replacement shake. For this one, we are going to evaluate the vanilla, because I am in a pretty vanilla mood right now.  If you look at the ingredients, this one isn’t particularly all natural. At this point with Zeal, I am fine with that and that means it is probably safe. I am only speculating, because I honestly haven’t gone through the protein with a fine toothed comb yet. It doesn’t appear to contain those wonky naturals that can cause problems, so they already have points.  Anyways, the mass market equivalent to this stuff is Slim Fast et.al. So basically, by having a meal replacement shake and some fruits/vegetables you are going to keep you full due to the fiber, and give you 300 calories roundabout per meal. So if you eat 300 calories per meal, have a couple of 100 calorie snacks guess what? Even if you eat a 1000 calorie dinner you are going to lose weight. Plus, it is low in sodium and refined carbs. You know what that does? Control blood sugar and reduce blood pressure (this comes through lower triglycerides and sodium reduction). Plus the “diabetes” cure people were probably eating like garbage before it, and since there are no actual studies on this stuff, I can make that assertion. People get type 2 for a reason, right? So let us get right to it. Nutritive analysis of ingredients…… GO!

Whey protein concentrate- We are all familiar with whey protein, we hear the muscle bros talk about it all of the time, right? Gotta get my protein bro. Whey is a byproduct of cheese manufacturing, contains some calcium, sodium, potassium, and other good stuff. Studies also show it to increase lean body mass when consumed after a workout for 6-10 weeks. Who would have thought? You want a 4:1 carb/protein ration after working out. Whey protein is safe and effective, like I wish all things in Zeal were.

 

Pea protein- Protein which comes from peas. Roughly the same as whey. It is pretty bioavailable as well, with a 90-97% absorption rate. Basically good ole fashioned vegetable protein.  

 

Fibersol 2 (maltodextrin) – I love when they include “proprietary ingredients” and then make outlandish claims about them. Basically this is the same way the Advantra Z is done. They buy it from someone else and stick it in their supplement. The difference is, this stuff won’t give you heart trouble like the Advantra Z can. Good old soluble fiber helps regulate cholesterol and keep you full. This is not secret. This is what fibersol’s site says. I am not including it in the references, just google it if you are interested.

 

Fibersol®-2 digestion-resistant maltodextrin is a soluble corn fiber that acts as a low-calorie bulking agent containing 90 percent dietary fiber. It can be used with minimal formulation adjustments in a variety of food applications to maintain or improve a product’s desired attributes.

 

 

Crystalline fructose- Fairly Safe up to 12 weeks. It hasn’t been evaluated for longer. It is possibly effective for osteoarthritis. It can modesty reduce the symptoms such as swelling and pain. It may not reduce stiffness or aggregate of the total symptoms. Some patients did not consider the symptom reduction enough to be clinically significant. It is a sweetener.

 

2-deoxyribose- It is likely safe when used orally or intravenously short term. Hasn’t been evaluated for pregnant or lactating mothers (haven’t you figured out by now if you are pregnant or lactating you should talk to your doctor before putting stuff in your body?) It seems effective for coronary artery disease and myoadenylate deaminase deficiency. There is nothing shockingly wrong with this but long term safety has not been studied.

 

White Kidney Bean extract- This is already listed and referenced with the burn pill, fibrous and assists with breaking down starches.

 

 

Glucommanan- It is an insoluble fiber. It is safe when used orally in food, powdered or capsule form, but not when in tablet form. It seems effective in treating type 2diabetes as it may reduce cholesterol and blood glucose levels. This type of fiber keeps you regular.

 

Sunflower oil – Oil which comes from sunflower seeds and can combat constipation. This is packed with Omega 6 acids depending on which variation of sunflower oil it is. Excess omega 6 can cause inflamation and CAD.

 

Maltodextrin- See fibersol, I don’t know why they list different names for the same thing twice. Remember the Cascara?

 

 

Polydextrose-  More Fiber, classified as soluble by the FDA.

 

 

Magnesium phosphate-  Mg. Atomic number 12. Safe if used orally and appropriately and aslong as you don’t exceed the UL intake of 350mg. It is lower for children under 8. Ever hear of milk of magnesia? That makes you poop. It also works very well for for treating people with low magnesium. It is also likely effective for managing pre eclampsia and eclampsia. Also it is the first therapy used for torasades de pointes. You need magnesium, just not too much.

 

 

Cellulose gum-  More Fiber.

 

Soy lecithin- Is safe and has GRAS status in amounts typically found in foods. It also seems effective to treat hepatic steatosos in medicinal amounts. It is an oily substance used in food and it keeps foods from separating. It is high in omega 6.

 

Dextrose- Glucose. It is a monosaccharide found in plants. Simple sugar.  

 

 

Salt – NaCL, sodium chloride, self-explanatory. Try not to exceed 2000-3000mg per day. Us Americans rarely have a deficiency in this category. It is actually hard to keep it low if you eat out once a day. Too much causes hypertension, too little causes hypernutremia. This is typically used in foods to make them salty. It is also in the ocean.

 

Sodium caseinate-  Casein Peptide. Casein is a slow burning protein. You find it in milk. It has been used to treat hypertension.

 

 

Mono and diglycerides- Used as an emulsifier and commonly made from animal products. They can also be synthetically produced. They are used to make things more shelf stable… a preservative. Contains trans fats.

 

Vanilla extract- This gives your shake a vanilla flavor. I would assume the chocolate one contains chocolate.

 

 

Potassium phosphate- Potassium. K. Atomic number 19. Works fantastic for treating hypokalemia. Potassium helps regulate blood pressure and alleviate cramps while working out. There are far more uses in the body that I don’t feel like going into. The UL is 80-90 mEq per day. You need potassium.

 

 

Calcium phosphate- Calcium, Ca, Atomic number 20. Don’t exceed 2500 mg/day. Works well as an antacid, reversing low calcium and low potassium. Calcium is important for bone health, you need calcium.

 

Stevia- Used as a sweetener in foods and has GRAS status in the US.

 

Ascorbic acid- Vitamin C has a myriad of functions in your body. See the wellness drink where I talk more about Vitamin C.  

 

 

Citrus pectin- Pectin in this case is used as a thickener. It can be mixed with kaolin for an antidiarrheal. (Kaopectate) or used to protect and soothe raw mouth and throat ulcers. Has GRAS status in amounts generally included in food.

 

Xanthan gum- Used as a thickening and suspending agent. Effective also for constipation.

 

Potassium citrate- Another form of potassium.

 

Sodium chloride –Salt, they listed it twice.

 

Acesulfame potassium- Artifical sweetener. Should leave a nice aftertaste. 😉

 

Alpha tocopherols- Vitamin E. See the wellness drink for more expounding on Vitamin E.

 

 

 

Whey protein concentrate

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17277594?dopt=Abstract

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17240782?dopt=Abstract

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18059587?dopt=Abstract

 

 

 

 

crystalline fructose

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16309928?dopt=Abstract

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19474240?dopt=Abstract

 

 

2-deoxyribose

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1776826?dopt=Abstract

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8815168?dopt=Abstract

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1354276?dopt=Abstract

 

Glucommanan

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10372241?dopt=Abstract

 

 

magnesium phosphate

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9583850?dopt=Abstract

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10586828?dopt=Abstract

 

soy lecithin

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1551541?dopt=Abstract

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10 thoughts on “Zeal Protein Shake – Shake it for me!

  1. Hey there! This post couldn’t be written any better! Reading through this post reminds me of my good old room mate! He always kept chatting about this. I will forward this post to him. Fairly certain he will have a good read. Many thanks for sharing!

    • I enjoyed your blog as well. You hit the nail on the head with the proper post workout refueling ratio as well. I hope your buddy picks up a thing or two about supplements they ate intriguing to say the least.

  2. I think you do a great job of evaluating the ingredients. However, you fail to realize that most of the time, when you’re taking a Wellness drink or a shake, or even the pills, you’re taking small amounts. You are not a scientist, nor a nutritionist; you probably put things way worse than this in your body on a daily basis (and probably given to you by your favorite family physician – yet you don’t question him or his ridiculous bill).

    Not everyone is going to have great results with Zeal; some people will have negative effects, just like is possible with ANYTHING you take. But overall, Zeal is an amazing product that has helped thousands of people.

    • Well David, you coming in here and questioning my credentials is certainly entertaining considering you appear to be one of those fight big pharmaceutical types. You should always get a second opinion on what your physician says if you feel doubtful. Herbals can be a great replacement for prescription meds. Take at St. John’s wort for example. It is wonderful for mild to moderate depression, but when it gets severe, there is no replacement for the prescription. However, the amounts of each aren’t disclosed in zeal, and it is not regulated as either. You could be getting a massive amount of one thing or another and not even know it. All natural is not synonymous with safe. Further more it can take herbals weeks to months to build up to effective levels where side effects or benefits can be noticed. You are correct in the assertion that it MAY not harm a healthy individual. Yet again, it is a roll of the dice. I speculated on how it may help people in my last post, you should give it a read. Doctors go to medical school and conduct continuing education for a reason. They have a vast knowledge of what works and what doesn’t and have access to and use the same resources which I used to create these posts and use in my job as a nutritionist every day. Oh, I would like everyone to notice how I didn’t delete a contradictory claim as the black car chasers do. If anyone has anything objective to post instead of conjecture, it is more than welcome.

  3. I’m shocked you didn’t talk more about casein. It’s been shown repeatedly to be carcinogenic and is a VERY common food intolerance. I advise almost all of my patients to not touch the stuff. Also, most of the good that is attributed to whey protein is from “un-denatured whey”. If they don’t explicitly say its un-denatured on the label then I wouldn’t be terrible impressed with that ingredient, either.

    Great blog! Keep up the good work!

    • Thanks! I always need more fodder to write about. What about those meatheads that take casein every night before they go to bed because it is a “slow burning protein”? LOL.

      • Poison, I tell you. I see SO much casein intolerance in my office- it’s second only to gluten.

        The fascinating thing is that whey has been shown to be highly beneficial (again, un-denatured) and casein is highly carcinogenic and inflammatory when isolated. Whole dairy is likely a ying/yang thing- the benefit of the whey cancels out much of the inflammatory effects of caseine. If you isolate casein (like the meatheads mentioned above) you’re asking for trouble and clearly don’t handstand nutrition 😛

  4. I have recently been introduced to this “Zeal thing” and found your review incredibly informative! I am particularly interested in the protein “shake” as I am currently using the ItWorks ProFit chocolate. I drink it with Almond milk, which I like. I was told (by the Zeal rep) that the soy in that shake posed a possible danger to me since my mother was diagnosed with estrogen based breast cancer 6 years ago. I was wondering if you’d consider doing research on the Zeal chocolate protein since you seemed to be OK with the vanilla.

    While I have no real idea what your credentials are, I read every word and looked at all your references so you appear to have been extremely thorough in your research. In all honesty, I don’t have the patience, so your time would be greatly appreciated.

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